Fun art craft for kids: Using finger-paints to learn about ladybugs habitat

using finger paints

Ladybugs are insects so small that you may be lucky to hold them in your hand. These harmless creatures also provide a safe way to take care of your plants. They love to feed on microscopic organisms like aphids, which can deteriorate a plant.

In science, there is plenty of observations about nature and children are the best at making scientific interpretations. Communication is key when children are exploring nature. A science journal is always a great way to record children observations of nature.

Learning about ladybugs is also good when you notice them in their natural environment. They like to live in plants, trees, shrubs, and flower beds. In this craft, children will be able to make a picture of where ladybugs live.

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Easy craft for kids: Using ladybug cutouts to learn about measurements

Ladybugs can captivate a child’s learning experience about insects. These tiny little bugs are amazing creatures of nature. Many children would even be more amazed to learn that they can keep plants healthy by eating plant pests like aphids.

Ladybugs are wonders of nature. Some children may like to hold them in their hands and observe their wings and spots. They may even live right in their own backyard.

Other wonderful ways to learn about ladybugs is through art and crafts. Here, children can learn about measurements. You’ll be able to explore about ladybugs by using household items and coloring.

Ladybug

Materials:

  • Ladybug pattern
  • Red construction paper
  • Black crayon
  • Safety scissors
  • Safe household items

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Instructions:

  1. Printout the ladybug pattern available in the science section.
  2. Trace them onto red construction paper.
  3. Use red construction paper to make 12 ladybugs.
  4. Make simple spots and markings with black crayons.
  5. Optional: color them a different shade of red
  6. Cut them out with safety scissors.
  7. Use as many ladybugs as possible to measure different household items: spoons, spatulas, CD cases
  8. Use ladybugs to measure arms, hands, legs.
  9. Compare and discuss the findings.

Which are bigger or smaller? How many ladybugs did it take to make certain measurements? Use the ladybug patterns to also learn about concepts like half-dozen and dozen.

Concepts like math are not limited to counters or coins. Many simple items like ladybug cutouts are perfect for children to grasp addition and subtraction.

Did you have fun counting these ladybugs?

How to make a homemade pinecone birdfeeder

Red Cardinal birds like to eat the crunchy seeds. Finches like to nimble on those seeds. And Woodpeckers like to peck away at the nearest branches. But in winter, there are few or no food sources for some of these amazing birds. Many of them depend on the countless backyard feeders placed by humans. Or, they may not have enough food to eat or to share with their young.

As the winter progresses, the natural resources begin to disappear for some of these birds. So to encourage and promote bird feeding for North American birds, the National Bird-Feeding Society proclaimed in 1994, February as the National Bird-Feeding Month.

For the past decades, bird enthusiasts across the nation set different types of feeders for these birds. There’s more you can do. You can make a simple bird feeder from the natural resources already in your backyard. In this project, you can learn how to make a very easy and simple bird feeder from pinecones. And this project is simple and safe to make with the kids.

Pinecone bird-feeder hanging on tree

Materials: 

  • Pinecones
  • Yarn
  • Cornmeal
  • Creamy peanut butter
  • Birdseeds
  • Plastic spoons
  • Safety scissors

Warning: For peanut butter allergies use the alternative method.

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Instructions:

  • Place some newspaper over the working surface.
  • Inspect the pinecone for bugs and spiders. Invert the pinecone and gently shake any excess debris that might adhere to the crevices.
  • Place a couple of tablespoons of creamy peanut butter on a small bowl. Try to avoid crunchy peanut butter since it can pose a choking hazard.
  • Use plastic spoons to slowly insert the peanut butter within the crevices of the pinecone. Place about a cup of cornmeal in a small bowl. Roll the peanut butter pinecone in the cornmeal to ensure that the pieces adhere.
  • Alternative: For children with peanut butter allergies, use a paste of a cup of cornmeal with a 1-2 teaspoons of water.
  • Place some birdseed on a shallow paper plate or bowl. Roll the pinecone in the seeds. Or let the children use their fingers to insert the seeds throughout the crevices of the pinecone.
  • Cut about a 12-inch piece of yarn. Tie it around the top of the pinecone. Make another knot at the end of the yarn. You can do this step one at any time.
  • Repeat the process if necessary, depending on the number of children.
  • Select a proper place to hang the bird feeder in your backyard or school yard. An adult should do this step.

If you see any type of birds, can you name them?

Here’s a list of some common backyard birds that you might encounter: American Goldfinch, Black-capped Chickadee, Red-breasted Nuthatch, Downy Woodpecker, Purple Finch, Northern Cardinal, House Finch, Blue Jay, Ruby-throated Hummingbird, or Chipping Sparrow.